Programs

Cash Investigation: Seeds of Profit

Sixty years of producing standardized fruit and vegetables and creating industrial hybrids have had a dramatic impact on their nutritional content. In the past 50 years, vegetables have lost 27% of their vitamin C and nearly half of their iron.

Take the tomato. Through multiple hybridizations, scientists are constantly producing redder, smoother, firmer fruit. But in the process, it has lost a quarter of its calcium and more than half of its vitamins. The seeds that produce the fruits and vegetables we consume are now the property of a handful of multinationals, like Bayer, and Dow-Dupont, who own them. These multinationals have their seeds produced predominantly in India, where workers are paid for just a handful of rupees while the company has a turnover of more than 2 billion euros. A globalized business where the seed sells for more than gold.

According to FAO, worldwide, 75% of the cultivated varieties have disappeared in the past 100 years. Loss of nutrients, privatization of life, We reveal the industrialists’ great monopoly over our fruit and veg.

PRODUCTION INFO

  • Year: 2019
  • Duration: 52 mins
  • Production: Premieres Lignes
  • Director: Linda Bendali
  • Available Versions: ENG, FRA
  • Country of production: France

VOD LINKS

FESTIVAL & AWARDS

  • Fredd Festival International du Film d'Environnement 2020 (France), Festival du Film vert 2020 (Switzerland), Ekotopfilm Envirofilm Festival 2020 (Slovakia), Hunger.Macht.profte festival 2020 (Austria).

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